SmallGovCon Week In Review February 4 – February 8, 2019

After a lovely weekend, temperatures have again dropped here in Lawrence. A quick Google search, however, tells me that a certain groundhog didn’t see his shadow last week, so here’s hoping we all get warmer temperatures soon . . . .

In the meantime, let’s warm our hearts with the latest government contracting news. Today we look at how the Pentagon plans to use the cloud and protect itself while doing so, how several companies survived the shutdown as they look toward another, and the millions it costs to settle a procurement fraud investigation.

Have a great weekend!

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Error in Table of Contents Dooms Proposal

By now, our frequent readers are familiar with GAO’s mantra that it is an offeror’s responsibility to submit a well-written proposal that complies with the solicitation’s requirements and risks being found unacceptable if it fails to do so.

That rule serves its purpose: it helps maintain an organized bidding process, under which the agency can evaluate proposals on an even footing. But it can also lead to harsh results, like it did in a recent protest challenging a proposal’s unacceptability due to its non-compliant table of contents.

Let’s take a look.

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SmallGovCon Week In Review January 28 – February 1, 2019

Happy February, everybody! After a bit of frigid weather here in Lawrence this past week (though not nearly as frigid as it was for our friends up north), we’re gearing up for a spring-like weekend. Don’t get too jealous: it’ll turn cold again just a few days later. Gotta love that Kansas weather!

Now that the federal government is open again (at least for now), let’s take a look at some of the post-shutdown news in this edition of the Week In Review. We’ll look at federal IT spending, mounting shutdown effects, and, as usual, some contractors behaving badly.

Have a great weekend!

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SmallGovCon Week In Review: January 21 – January 25, 2019

It has been a bit of a double-whammy for us in the Kansas City-area this week. Not only did our Chiefs lose in a heartbreaker last weekend, but we’ve also been dealing with cold temperatures, snow, and ice.

But there is also some good news. As we’re writing this post, word came down that the government will soon reopen (if only temporarily). To all our friends that work for or with the federal government, we’re thrilled that you’ll soon be back at work.

With that, let’s take a look at the week-that-was in federal government contracting. Have a great weekend, everyone!

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Section 809 Panel Recommends Eliminating COFC’s Ability to Consider Protests After GAO’s Resolution

Among its suggestions to streamline the acquisition process, the Section 809 Panel has proposed to eliminate the ability to file a protest at GAO and the Court of Federal Claims. Instead, the Panel would require protesters to choose between filing at GAO or the Court.

Let’s take a look.

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SmallGovCon Week In Review January 14 – January 18, 2019

As the shutdown ticks into its 27th day, federal employees and contractors across the nation wait in limbo with no end in sight. Hopefully the pain ends soon, and everyone can get back to work.

Meanwhile, closer to home, folks are very excited about the AFC Championship this weekend. Hopefully our New England-area readers will excuse our overt partisanship towards the Chiefs.

Even with the shutdown, there have been some important developments in government contracting. This week, we’ll look at a new DOD rule about LPTA procedures, suggestions for the DOD’s CIO, and more.

Have a great weekend . . . and GO CHIEFS!

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What’s the Purpose of a Bid Protest? Section 809 Panel Suggests An Answer

Counseling clients and prospective clients on a potential bid protest, we often ask: Why would you like to file this protest? Of course, the answer inevitably involves the discussion of a flaw (or several) in the evaluation process that, had they not been committed, would have resulted in a different award decision.

In its latest report, the Section 809 Panel offers another consideration: Will this protest ensure confidence in the acquisition system?

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