A Pre-Award Protest Probably Isn’t the Place to Raise Suspicions of Wage Violations

Let’s suppose you’re a contractor that provides services to the federal government. Typically, your contract will require you to pay your employees the prevailing wage rates promulgated under the Service Contract Act.

What if you suspect that, under previous contracts, your competitors failed to pay their employees the mandated prevailing rates? Can you use a pre-award bid protest to obligate a procuring agency to police possible ongoing non-compliance through solicitation provisions? If you say yes, perhaps you should keep reading.

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SmallGovCon Welcomes Haley Claxton!

I am very pleased to announce that Haley Claxton has joined our team of attorney-authors here at SmallGovCon.  Haley is an associate attorney with Koprince Law LLC, where her practice focuses on federal government contracts law.

Haley is a recent graduate of the University of Kansas Law School, and has served as a law clerk to the Library of Congress Office of the General Counsel in Washington, DC.  Check out Haley’s full biography to learn more about our newest author, and don’t miss her first SmallGovCon post on new rules recently implemented at the Civilian Board of Contract Appeals.

Court of Federal Claims Rejects Unsupported Decision to Cancel Solicitation

An agency ordinarily enjoys very broad discretion in its procurement-related decisions. This includes whether an agency will award a contract or, instead, cancel a procurement.

Broad as this discretion is, however, an agency does not have carte blanche to cancel a procurement on a whim. As a recent Court of Federal Claims decision shows, an agency must support its decision with sufficient information, lest the cancellation decision itself be successfully protested.

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Where Non-Price Ratings Identical, Agency Wasn’t Required to Choose Lower-Priced Offeror

In a best value competition, when two offerors receive identical adjectival scores on the non-price factors, one might assume that the procuring agency would be required to award the contract to the lower-priced offeror.

Not so.  In a recent bid protest decision, the GAO held that where two offerors received identical scores on three non-price factors, the agency could still elect to award the contract to the higher-priced offeror.

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