2018 NDAA Increases Civilian Micro-Purchase Threshold to $10,000

The 2018 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) has generated lots of headlines regarding the so-called “Amazon amendment” and the Act’s prohibition on the Russian IT company Kaspersky Labs products. But gone under reported is a huge change to how the government makes small purchases.

The 2018 NDAA, signed by President Donald Trump on December 12, increases the standard micro-purchase threshold applicable to civilian agencies from $3,000 to $10,000. Last year, the NDAA increased the Department of Defense (DoD) micro-purchase threshold to $5,000. This larger jump for civilian agencies is likely to have large impact on government purchasing.

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SmallGovCon Week In Review: August 29-September 2, 2016

We have been hard a work all week long here at Koprince Law and are ready to take advantage of the Labor Day weekend. Not only is it a long weekend, but it is also the start of the college football season. There is nothing better than football, tailgating and cooler weather to get you in the mood for fall (although our local Kansas Jayhawks haven’t exactly been tearing up the gridiron in recent years).

Before you head out the door to enjoy the holiday weekend, it’s time for the SmallGovCon Week In Review. This week’s edition includes articles on the recent implementation of the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces final rule, a look at the large amount of money spent of professional services and how that spending is (or isn’t) tracked, a proposed rule for streamlining awards for innovative technology projects and much more.

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DoD Proposes Hotline Poster Consolidation

Defense contractors looking for a little more wall space to hang inspirational cat posters may be in luck.  Today, the DoD issued a proposal to consolidate the various hotline poster requirements under DFARS 252.203-7004 (Display of Hotline Posters).

The DoD proposal certainly doesn’t fall under the category of major contracting news, but will be a welcome change for contractors feeling a little overburdened with mandatory government posters.

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DFARS Clause Problem Costs Contractor $288K

A contractor’s failure to follow the requirements of DFARS 252.232-7007 (Limitation of Government’s Obligation), also known as the “LOGO” clause, resulted in the contractor performing more than $288,000 in free work for the government.

The contractor’s dilemma is an important reminder to be aware of–and scrupulously comply with–the LOGO clause and similar FAR clauses.

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