5 Things You Should Know: SBA’s 8(a) Business Development Program (The Basics)

If you’re a small business owner interested in government contracts, you’ve probably heard about the SBA’s 8(a) Business Development Program. The 8(a) Program itself is complex, but its potential benefits are tremendous. In this post, I’ll break down some of the very basics about the 8(a) Program, leaving some of its complexities for upcoming posts.

Let’s get to it: here are five things you should know about the 8(a) Program.

  1. What is the 8(a) Program?

Like SBA’s other contracting programs, the 8(a) Program is a business development program—its purpose is to assist eligible disadvantaged small businesses compete in the American economy through business development.

  1. What are the benefits to participating?

Participating in the 8(a) Program opens several doors to success. Each year, the federal government’s goal is to award at least 5% of all prime contracts to small disadvantaged businesses, which include 8(a) Program participants. To meet this goal, the government issues billions of dollars of awards annually to 8(a) Program participants through sole-source awards and set-asides. Participants are also allowed to join in mentor/protégé and joint venture relationships to further increase their ability to participate in the American economy. Additionally, the SBA provides targeted business development counseling to 8(a) participants.

  1. Is your business eligible to participate?

Given these incentives, the desire to participate in the 8(a) Program is obvious. But can your business participate?

SBA has laid out detailed eligibility requirements. A future post will discuss them in greater detail but, in general, a business typically must be small under its primary NAICS code, and be unconditionally owned and controlled by one or more socially- and economically-disadvantaged individuals who are of good character. (There are some separate requirements for businesses owned by Indian Tribes, Alaska Native Corporations, Native Hawaiian Organizations, and Community Development Corporations.) The business, moreover, must maintain its eligibility throughout the course of its participation.

One more thing: 8(a) Program participation is a one-time thing. So if your business has previously participated in the 8(a) Program, or if you’re a disadvantaged individual that has already participated, the SBA won’t allow you to participate again—although Tribes, ANCs, NHOs and CDCs have some different rules.

  1. How long can your business participate in the 8(a) Program?

The presumptive term is 9 years. But this term can be shortened by the participant or the SBA—if, for example, the concern is successful enough to graduate from the Program or fails to maintain its eligibility. The term cannot be lengthened, although it can be temporarily suspended in rare instances.

  1. How can your business apply?

Applications must be submitted electronically to the SBA and must include any supporting information requested by the SBA (like corporate organization documents and personal and business tax returns). Your local SBA office should be able to provide a list of all required documents.

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Participating in the 8(a) Program can be a great way to grow your small business. Look for additional 5 Things posts discussing its requirements and benefits in greater detail. In the meantime, please call me if you have any questions about eligibility or applying for the Program.